A Polar Bear Story

July 3, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog

I don’t know if the story is true or not but I’ll chose to believe that it is.  But as they say a picture is worth a thousand words.  Check it out:

Norbert Rosing’s striking images of a wild polar bear coming upon tethered sled dogs in the wilds of Canada’s Hudson Bay. 

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The Photographer was sure that he was going to see the end of his dogs when this
Polar bear wandered in but instead, the strangest of things happened…

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It was so hard to believe, but this bear only needed someone to hug! 

 

 

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And during the entire week, that Polar Bear came around every night to play with the dogs.

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  • Winsor Pilates

Comments

One Response to “A Polar Bear Story”
  1. markus7a says:

    Heart warming images. I am suspicious however, perhaps global warming has fried this Polar Bear’s mind. Kidding aside, if this bear’s behavior is unusual or unnatural in one way, it may also be a natural response under circumstances of isolation or environmental duress. With the declining numbers of these bears it seems possible that this one could have been wandering in the frozen wastes alone for an unnaturally long time. It is both shockingly sad, and entirely possible that these bears will not be around for more than another generation or two. These images, though not representative of the average bear, drive that home with additional poignancy.
    They also make me think of Werner Herzog’s film “Grizzly Man”, and the commentary he offers toward the end, in which he describes the character of the bears in utterly impersonal terms, as predatory creatures that have been programmed to find food. While his point was to challenge the notion that there was some form of personal bond possible between man and bear, these images reveal another possible perspective upon wild creatures. The fact that we cannot relate to them on terms that are comprehensible to us, (i.e. on our own terms, as when we form bonds of affection with our pets) does not reduce them to creatures that lack the capacity for feeling, that lack an emotional life. The truth is, most of us know next to nothing about wild creatures. That is our great loss.