Letting Go Requires Love

August 31, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

Today I read Theresa Brown’s “A Dying Patient Is Not A Battle Field” on CNN.Com.  Theresa is an oncology nurse in Pennsylvania. She is a leading contributor to The New York Times’ blog Well and the author of “Critical Care: A New Nurse Faces Death, Life, and Everything in Between.”

In this particular piece Theresa discusses the end of life of a cancer patient who encouraged by family and doctors decides to continue a losing battle with his illness.  The end result was a more brutal death than if the patient had chosen to go home and live what was left of his life the best way possible.  Theresa writes if the patient had been given clear information of the consequences of continuing chemotherapy he would have chosen to go home.  Most people knowing there is almost no chance for survival would move forward with chemotherapy especially when their bodies are already so weak and fragile.

Nurse Brown, you are so right and wise.

In the last couple of months of my husband’s life it had become clear to me that the end was coming.  In the last couple of weeks it was clear the end had arrived.

Read more

Share

Life Lessons 2

August 30, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

I read today on CNN.com about a Sri Lankan woman who went to work in Saudi Arabia as a housemaid.  When the Sri Lankan woman complained about being overworked the Saudi couple went on to hammer 18 nails into her body.

What immediately came to my mind was the fact that the Sri Lankan woman was no more than an object to the Saudi couple.  She was never seen by them as a mother, sister, or a friend.  To them she was just a body.

Read more

Share

Conquering Fear

August 29, 2010 by  
Filed under Inspiring People

This is a video of my friend Kurt Yeager.  He lost half his leg, had his bladder perforated, and his hip broken in a couple of places but after sometime Kurt conquered his fear and got back on his bike.

I knew Kurt for awhile before I knew he had a disability because he has taught himself to walk in a way that his metal half leg is part of his body. Kurt is in control of his disability and is an inspiration.

Kurt Yaeger - Athlete from Kurt Yaeger on Vimeo.

Share

Life Lessons

August 29, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

I have just watched the brilliant TED TALK (ideas worth spreading) below by Lewis Pugh.  Please watch as it contains important observations and lessons about life.

Pugh, is a 40-year-old former reservist in Britain’s special forces regiment, the Special Air Service.  He has gained worldwide attention for his extreme adventures, designed to dramatize the environmental threats to the planet.

Besides doing something important for the environment Pugh reminds us of how important it is to fully commit to that we want to achieve.

Read more

Share

How To Be A Friend

August 27, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

heart on the beach

When I was eleven years old I participated in my first but modified Secret Santa.  The difference between the traditional game and ours was that; 1- it wasn’t Christmas and 2 – we had to add to the gift a letter letting our friend know our thoughts about them.

I don’t remember what my gift was but I remember what I wrote because of its consequences.  On a piece of paper I wrote the words “I like you. You are nice but not very smart.”

Read more

Share

Surviving Life’s Low Points

August 26, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

Today is my fourth wedding anniversary.   I am here but my husband isn’t.  We actually only got to commemorate our first wedding anniversary.  Chris passed away nine days before our second.

Read more

Share

Video Blog – 10

August 25, 2010 by  
Filed under Popular Posts, Video

How to achieve a sense of well-being.

Share

How To Turn Strangers Into Members Of Our Community

August 25, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

I just saw the below video on CNNMONEY.com.  It talks about a small pharmacy in New York which still thrives even though a Walgreen has moved next door.  The owner who is also the pharmacist attributes his success to customer care and his true interest in being personal and helping others.

In this age of pre-recorded messages, employees hiding behind corporations and greed, we are all starved for simple courteous daily connections.    I’m not referring to relationships with friends and family, but am discussing brief relationships we have with almost total strangers.

Read more

Share

Making Our Personal History Count

August 23, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

Everybody needs his memories.  They keep the wolf of insignificance from the door.  ~Saul Bellow

A couple of days ago, a friend of mine from NY – who I had not seen in three years – came over with her 14 year-old and her 7 year-old sons to have dinner with me.

I asked my friend if her boys were having a good time in LA.  She said the young one was but her teen was complaining about not being back in NY with his friends.   After thinking for a minute my friend added she thought her son would in the future look back at this trip and actually think of it with fondness.  “It will be part of his memories and history”, she said.

After they left I thought about her comment.  How many experiences we all have that while we are going through them we fail to give the attention they deserve?

Read more

Share

Deciding Between Personal Well-Being And A Greater Good

August 22, 2010 by  
Filed under Featured

The below Huffington Post article touches on an interesting dilemma we all have to deal with on a daily basis; the internal negotiation we go through between what we know are our needs and what we  know would be easier on somebody else or a group.

In a smaller scale these are the decisions we have to make between friends, partners or family members.  In a larger scale they are the decisions made by organizations and countries.

My concern is for the smaller scale dilemmas when we have to choose saying or not the truth to a partner or when to keep the “peace” in a family situation by not bringing up the fact that we are being disrespected or ignored.

Read more

Share

Next Page »