Are You Afraid Of Dying?

May 31, 2011 by  
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I went to see a film, “Tree of Life”, on Saturday with a friend of mine.  The film, written and directed by Terrence Malick, deals with such existential questions as: Where is God? Where is the person I used to be? And where are the people that have departed?  Terrence Malick, in my opinion, doesn’t tell stories, but instead he opens the door to the possibility of a deeply intimate voyage.  His images, words and sounds are the conduit, but the experience is unique to each one of us.

On the way home, while talking about the film, my friend said: “I’m not afraid of dying.”  It was the second time that week I was hearing the same statement.  This time I thought I should ask what this friend meant.  He went on to explain that at some point in his life he had been a drug-addict and an alcoholic, and because of that he had developed some serious medical conditions that would end in death if he didn’t stop with the addiction.  Because he loved life more than drugs and alcohol, he went into a facility and now has been sober for twenty years.

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An Amputee Wrestling Champion Shares His Passion and Knowledge With Others

May 30, 2011 by  
Filed under Inspiring People

With ingenuity and passion we can achieve anything we set our hearts to.

NBC’s Bob Dotson profiles Nick Ackerman, who became a college wrestling champ despite being an amputee – and who now crafts prosthetic legs for a new generation.

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

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Mark Zuckerberg Reminded Me Of…

May 28, 2011 by  
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So I was just reading about Mark Zuckerberg’ decision of slaughtering all the meat he consumes.  While I’m no stranger to this action – my grandmother used to kill the chickens my family ate in the back of the house – it made me think how much of life we live without consciousness, and how much we lose because of it.

Zuckerberg says by killing his own animal he will profit in two ways: 1 – he will eat healthier and 2 – he will have a greater connection and consciousness when consuming that which is his life force.  I’m interested in the latter concept. In this fast world of ours we often behave as if we were sleep walking and the consequence is we lose many opportunities to be grateful and inspired.

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Change Your Focus And Stop Being Stressed

May 26, 2011 by  
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Felt a real kinship with the post below.  First because like the author I too live in Los Angeles, and second because I too work in Hollywood.  But that is not the point of the post. The point is as a nation we have lost our ability to unplug and relax.  We have actually convinced ourselves that the more stressed out and tired we are, the more needed and important we become.

I’m here to tell you those assumptions are untrue.  If we are tired and stressed we are just that; tired and stressed.  We are no good to ourselves and to anyone else.

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Wise Up And Take Time For Yourself

May 23, 2011 by  
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The below CNN.com post discusses vacation or lack off in the United States.  I love the post because it gives statistics to a subject I’ve written quite a bit about.

Somehow somewhere the idea of happiness and accomplishment in the US became tied up with work.  Here we wear multi-tasking and working seven days a week as a badge of honor.  Here always being plugged in makes us feel important or needed.

I wonder if in this country’s past history, a group of men got together and said: “How do we make people work around the clock – without them thinking about it – so we can make tons of money? Let’s convince them, they will be seen as respectable and dependable.”

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Is Happiness Overrated?

May 21, 2011 by  
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Posted below is an excellent article I found today in the New York Times – albeit a little late, it was published on May 16th.

It’s about Martin Seligman’s new book, “Flourish”.  Seligman is also the writer of the 2002 bestseller “American Happiness” and founder of the positive psychology movement.

It is an excellent post because it states that happiness is overrated. The post then goes on to describe what the feeling of well-being is, and the necessary elements to get there.  It lists 5 elements and they are: 1- positive emotion, 2 – engagement, 3 – relationships, 4 – meaning and 5 – accomplishment.  These five elements together create a sense of well-being which is actually permanent and not transient like happiness.

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Baseball Player Goes Back To Pitching After Losing An Eye

May 19, 2011 by  
Filed under Inspiring People

The comeback story of the one-eyed pitcher is the buzz of baseball dugouts in the Mississippi River Valley, passed down the bench like a bag of sunflower seeds.

No one would have called Jordan Underwood a quitter if he had never walked onto a pitcher’s mound again. But two years after a line drive smashed his cheekbone and destroyed his left eye, Underwood is back up on the hill, starting games. And winning…Continued

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Let Go Of The Small Stuff

May 19, 2011 by  
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Photo by Angie Rubin

Learning to let go can be a life-long process, but if we are striving for a well-balanced life, it is a skill we must acquire.

We are bombarded on a daily basis by situations and people that we feel frustrate or mistreat us.  Of course we all also have the devastating loses when we have to experience living without a loved one.  But I’m not going to be talking about that “letting go”.

I want to talk about the letting go of the small stuff because that is what on a daily basis wears us out.

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Freedom Rider; A Life Lesson

May 16, 2011 by  
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The below post from CNN.com is a powerful read in many different ways.  It is a study in commitment, community and self-discovery. The post is an excerpt of John Blake’s 2004 book “Children of the Movement’.  It contains the story of James Zwerg, now 71, a white Freedom Rider.

In 1961, the Freedom Riders – a group of black and white college students – set out for the Deep South to call for change. They were met by hatred and violence — and local police often refused to intervene. But the Riders’ efforts transformed the civil rights movement.  Through it all they maintained their focus on their non-violent mission of riding together.

James Zwerg was drawn to the Freedom Rides after having a black roommate while attending Beloit College in Wisconsin. He grew to admire his roommate and was shocked to see how his black friend was treated by whites when they went out in public together.

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Small Actions With The Power To Change The World

May 13, 2011 by  
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Photo By Angie Rubin

A couple of weeks ago, I posted about a documentary I had seen; Waste Land. One of my points of discussion was how clearly the documentary showed that anything can happen to anyone.  I don’t think that was the focus of the film, but none the less it told the story of a garbage picker who through meeting and participating in an artist’s work, ended up going to London for an auction, being featured in a commercial campaign for Coca Cola and shaking hands with environmentalists.  It was a great example of life’s possibilities because visually it showed a man in the worst job possible; picking through garbage in the largest landfill on earth, and then being experiencing a completely different life.

Today, I was reading a post by Rabbi Wolpe.  In it he also discusses how by each action we take we transform our lives.  He also shares an interesting piece of history that shows how small events can have huge consequences.

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