Loving What Is: Four Questions That Could Change Your Life

June 24, 2010 by  
Filed under Featured

I really like this post by Stacey Lawson.  It is an excerpt of her interview with Byron Katie, the writer of such books as “Loving What is” and “A Thousand Names For Joy”.

The reason I like this interview is that it talks about the story WE create around an event and how that story then becomes what perpetuates our pain.   In other words the feelings we attach to an event is what keeps us stuck in that event.

I recently caught myself feeling frustrated and sad about a project I’ve been pouring my heart into but have yet to see what I thought it was the corresponding success.  I was faced with two choices either give up the project or change how I felt about it.  When I changed my expectations  I was able to continue to work on my project with the same enthusiasm I had when I first started.  I changed my thinking and with that I changed the way I was experiencing my project.  I now look forward to the work.

Stacey Lawson

Co-founder of the Center for Entrepreneurship and Technology UC Berkeley

When I read this line in Katie’s best-selling book Loving What Is, it struck a deep chord. We are often encouraged to “Stay in the Now,” and to “Accept What Is,” but the raw truth of Katie’s declaration hit home. Fighting, judging and resisting reality is simply a losing proposition. It’s stressful. And it doesn’t work … 100 percent of the time.

So what does work?

Byron Katie has developed a simple process, called “The Work,” to identify and question the thoughts that cause all the fear and suffering in the world. According to her, it is not the actual events of our lives, but the stories we hold about them, that bring us pain. The key to ending our suffering is examining our unexamined beliefs…Continued

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Perseverance

May 26, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

When the world says, “Give up,”
Hope whispers, “Try it one more time.”
~Author Unknown

cloud_thumbI have led and lead an unconventional life.  It is made out of the creation and execution of ideas.  I deal with rejection, disappointments and frustrations on a daily basis.  I want to see my ideas come to reality but the road is often long and arduous.

Along the way I have learned to deal with:

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Living Life In Our Own Terms

May 14, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

heart on the beach

heart on the beach

It is so hard to live by the beat of our own drums.  The world around keeps telling us we need to produce and to succeed.  We need to run faster and achieve more than our neighbors.  We have all fallen prey to what we have created ourselves; equating well being with money, power and fame.

So it is hard to maintain equilibrium even when we know to achieve any level of happiness – and that is what we are all looking for right?  – we need to satisfy and energize our physical, emotional, mental and spiritual needs.

Running as fast as we can thinking more is better creates high levels of dissatisfaction.  I’m not a religious person but I appreciate all religions realizing the need for solitude and meditation for well balanced living.

Multi-tasking while feeling the incredible pressure to succeed turns our lives into stress tanks where we live in full immersion.

We have no time to actually mull over problems, obstacles, and issues.  We have to plow forward.  No time to waste. So our minds don’t get the work out they need.  They are being fed the equivalent of fast food.

We also spend most of our days sitting in front of a computer eating out of brown paper bags and cutting our sleep down in order to produce more.

So to swim away from the current of “more, more, more” it takes self love and being diligent.  It requires believing in ourselves and our inner voices.  It takes saying to ourselves: “I will not run with the bulls.  I will take my time and follow my own intuition.  My path is my own.”

Change has always come from people that belief life should be different.

We have all a better guide in ourselves, if we would attend to it, than any other person can be.  ~Jane Austen

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Live Your Passion

May 1, 2010 by  
Filed under Featured

Sandra Magsamen

Artist Sandra Magsamen knows firsthand what it takes to make your passion your life’s work. Her handmade pottery has become a multimillion-dollar gift business and has expanded to include home décor, jewelry, bedding, greeting cards and more. She shares insight on how to live your passion.

There are no big secrets to making your dreams come true and doing what you’re passionate about. But there are three ingredients found in every dream realized. They are:

  • The belief in yourself and in your dream
  • A heaping dose of passion and imagination
  • A lot of hard work

Take the following steps toward pursuing what your are passionate about:

…Continued

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Believing In Miracles

April 18, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

There are days when I’m reminded of a moment in time that I’d not thought of for a long time. My heart smiles. My soul dances. My tears fall. I am trying so hard to stand strong and trust. The path that leads you to a place where your prayers and dreams come true is there, trust and believe in miracles…

Death is nothing at all.

I have only slipped away into the next room.

I am I and you are you.

Whatever we were to each other, that we are still.

Call me by my old familiar name,

speak to me in the easy way which you always used.

Put no difference into your tone;

wear no false air of solemnity or sorrow.

Laugh as we always laughed

at the little jokes we enjoyed together.

Play… smile… think of me… pray for me.

Let my name be ever the household word that it always was.

… I am but waiting for you, for an interval,

somewhere very near just around the corner.

All is well.

Canon Henry Scott Holland, English Clergyman and Theologian

[1847-1918]

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