First Steps Towards Finding Contentment

October 18, 2010 by  
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By Angie Rubin

I can’t tell you how to live your life.  Actually nobody can.  I also can’t tell you how to find contentment.  Again nobody can.  But I can share with you, life tools I have had to learn to live and thrive.   As I share, take what makes sense to you and leave on the computer screen what doesn’t.

Accepting ourselves and our lives as they are today is the first step towards appreciating life.

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Slowing Down For Self-Love

June 3, 2010 by  
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heart on the beach

heart on the beach

I’ve always wanted to do important things.  I don’t know where that came from but since I was a little girl I felt the pull for something “big”.

As I grew up that inner feeling turned into inner drive and some of my desire to do “big” things started to be associated with career success.  All of that would have been fine if I along the way didn’t loose – or maybe I never had – the ability to appreciate qualities and accomplishments of mine that I didn’t judge by the same standards I considered material success.  That was my loss and the result; a steady decline in self-esteem.

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John Wooden, The Meaning Of Success

March 20, 2010 by  
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I really love John’s talk.  He says: “Reputation is what others perceive of you.  Character is what you are.  And character is always more important than reputation.”

John Wooden, affectionately known as Coach, led UCLA to record wins that are still unmatched in the world of basketball.

With profound simplicity, Coach John Wooden redefines success and urges us all to pursue the best in ourselves. In this inspiring talk he shares the advice he gave his players at UCLA, quotes poetry and remembers his father’s wisdom. John Wooden is 99.

Wooden met his future wife, Nell Riley, at a carnival in July 1926.  John and his wife had a son, James Hugh Wooden, and a daughter, Nancy Anne Muehlhausen. Nell died on March 21, 1985 from cancer.

Wooden has remained devoted to Nell, even decades after her death. Since her death, he has kept to a monthly ritual (health permitting)—on the 21st, he visits her grave, and then writes a love letter to her. After completing the letter, he places it in an envelope and adds it to a stack of similar letters that has accumulated over the years on the pillow she slept on during their life together.

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