The Yummy Book: 25 Life Recipes For Happy Living

March 3, 2012 by  
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From March 4th through March 10th “The Yummy Book: 25 Life Recipes For Happy Living” will be on sale at Smashwords for $1.50.

This is a really easy to read book where you can always find a positive word.  All formats are available for a download.

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How To Live A Life Of Awe And Inspiration

November 21, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

Angie Rubin

AWE, an emotion variously combining veneration, and wonder that is inspired by authority or by the sacred or sublime.

Is there anything more moving than being overwhelmed by a sight or a feeling that moves us at a core level?

In his article for O Magazine David Hochman writes: “Scientists say it pays to cultivate more wonder in your life, whether by forwarding heart-swelling news stories or hiking the Grand Canyon. That’s because channeling awe not only produces pleasant physiological effects—such as the warm feeling in the chest activated by the vagus nerve—and gives a sense of fulfillment; it “can help a person reflect on how an upsetting event fits into their philosophy of life, or how their personal experience unites them with humanity,” says Michelle Shiota, PhD, an assistant professor of psychology at Arizona State University.”

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A KCRW Story

August 1, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog

While driving yesterday I was listening to the KCRW, which is Southern California’s leading public radio.  I wish I could remember the show but I don’t.  I’ve actually tried to search for it but came out empty.

In any case, the show was about what is happening to a group of women in Iraq; women that have lost their male protectors due to the war and internal instability, and are rapped by other men and then pushed away and abandoned by their own families.

The woman being interviewed (I don’t know if she was a journalist or worked for a women’s organization) was describing the shelters these victims are forced to go to; mostly rat infested basements with no windows and very little food.  These are not government sponsored shelters; they are supported by foreign women organizations and single donors. Also because these women are undesirable to their own society they have to hide and keep quiet. They become human shadows.

The woman giving the interview was going on about the dire situation of these victims when she was asked by the radio interviewer if she thought, prior to visiting the shelters, that what she was going to see was better or worse than what she saw.

The interviewed woman took a pause and said something like “the conditions in which these women live are the most precarious possible.  At night the rats come out and go on their makeshift beds.  They crawl around the children. But…” – and her BUT is what really moved me – “one day the radio was playing a very popular song and all of a sudden the women in the shelter got up and started to dance and sing with each other.  They laughed, they danced, they sang and I thought to myself how little it takes for humans to find laughter.”  I’m paraphrasing the interviewed woman’s dialogue as I don’t remember the exact words.  But what’s important is that these women going through horrific life experiences could find a moment of respite from their lives with each other in the beat of a popular song. That is the strength of the human spirit which searches for moments of happiness and of sharing.

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Two Men In A Hospital Room

July 31, 2009 by  
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Two men, both seriously ill, occupied the same hospital room. 

One man was allowed to sit up in his bed for an hour each afternoon to help drain the fluid from his lungs. His bed was next to the room’s only window. 

The other man had to spend all his time flat on his back. 

The men talked for hours on end.  They spoke of their wives and families, their homes, their jobs, their involvement in the military service, where they had been on vacation..

Every afternoon, when the man in the bed by the window could sit up, he would pass the time by describing to his roommate all the things he could see outside the window.

The man in the other bed began to live for those one hour periods where his world would be broadened and enlivened by all the activity and color of the world outside.

The window overlooked a park with a lovely lake. Ducks and swans played on the water while children sailed their model boats. Young lovers walked arm in arm amidst flowers of every color and a fine view of the city skyline could be seen in the distance.

As the man by the window described all this in exquisite details, the man on the other side of the room would close his eyes and imagine this picturesque scene. 

One warm afternoon, the man by the window described a parade passing by.

Although the other man could not hear the band – he could see it in his mind’s eye as the gentleman by the window portrayed it with descriptive words.

Days, weeks and months passed. 

One morning, the day nurse arrived to bring water for their baths only to find the lifeless body of the man by the window, who had died peacefully in his sleep. 

She was saddened and called the hospital attendants to take the body away. 

As soon as it seemed appropriate, the other man asked if he could be moved next to the window. The nurse was happy to make the switch, and after making sure he was comfortable, she left him alone. 

Slowly, painfully, he propped himself up on one elbow to take his first look at the real world outside.  He strained to slowly turn to look out the window besides the bed. 

It faced a blank wall.

The man asked the nurse what could have compelled his deceased roommate who had described such wonderful things outside this window.

The nurse responded that the man was blind and could not even see the wall.  She said, ‘Perhaps he just wanted to encourage you.’ 

Epilogue: 

There is tremendous happiness in making others happy, despite our own situations.  So if you haven’t tried it, go out today and help someone.

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Immigrant Surgeon

July 28, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog

If you ever thought your dreams were beyond your scoop, watch this video and you’ll be inspired to change your mind.

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Paralyzed Guitarrist Plays On

July 23, 2009 by  
Filed under Inspiring People

jason-becker1

Jason Becker is a former rock star who has continued a brilliant music career against all odds. Doctors were ready to give up on him, but he’s still going strong.

Jason can no longer speak or move his body, but he remains a brilliant composer with a legion of fans and a latest CD which came out in 2008

Jason’s musical odyssey began when he was just five and got his first guitar. By the time he was 13, he could play note for note with Eric Clapton recordings. By 17, he had a record deal of his own.

By the late 1980′s, Jason was one of the most critically acclaimed rock guitarists in the world.

In 1990, Jason was lead guitarist and helped write David Lee Roth’s gold record “A Little Ain’t Enough.”

That same year, when Jason was just 19, he was diagnosed with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s Disease. It’s a neuromuscular condition that slowly took away Jason’s ability to control his body.

When Jason could no longer play guitar, he began composing on a keyboard. When he could no longer move his hands, he used a computer. He had a special visor with a sensor on top that moved the cursor on the screen. When Jason opened his mouth, his chin clicked the mouse. But as Jason’s health got worse, he lost the ability to speak and even to move his head.

His father, Gary Becker, then devised a communication system using an alphabet board and simple eye movements so Jason could spell out his thoughts with his eyes. His family and friends learned to interpret.

Jason is a very inspiring man, even with all his difficulties he still loves life and finds ways to have a fulfilling life. 

Below is an excerpt of his story in his own words.

1997

“One particular event in the hospital changed my life. I hadn’t slept for well over 36 hours. Every hour or two a nurse came in to stick a tube down my throat to suction out mucous from my lungs. This made me violently cough which made my groin unbearably painful. I felt that one more suction would literally kill me. I prayed to God very sincerely to not let me die without knowing the point of it all and learning more about Him.

This night at 4:00 AM, my girlfriend was too exhausted to wake up. The nurse who then came in knew I was frantically trying to say no to suction, but she said, “I am just doing my job.” She wouldn’t wake my girlfriend up. When she finally left I lay in the dark feeling raped. I felt the life start to leave my body. My eyes were open but I couldn’t even tense one muscle. I started to black out. All at once I heard distant voices of people I love. After all this hellish fear and confusion, the good stuff began.

While I was still dying, I heard the OM. I felt I was being cradled by something familiar. In one silly vibration – such power, love, infinite wisdom, everything to be known and felt if only I could comprehend one tiny piece of its all-encompassing perfection. During these most blissful moments of my life, something in my heart said, “Lord, I am not ready to go”. Instantly I felt life coming back to my body. My eyes were uncontrollably lifted to gaze in my forehead. Without a body, clearer than “life”, I went through a door with an eye on it. I believe God was showing me “heaven”. It was my idea of a perfect place.

Whatever I thought was effortlessly manifest. In my mind I created a guitar and hands to play it. From my mind effortlessly flowed the most beautiful music I have ever heard. Before I even thought of the next perfect phrase it would flow into the ears. I think God was showing me the human potential. We work so hard but if we surrender to God there is no limit to our capabilities. After God was finished trying to teach something to this egotistic knucklehead, my eyes fell back down to my girlfriend sleeping on a cot in the hospital. As I slowly gathered myself and realized the incredible blessing I had received, I felt only love. I tried to remember anger and pain but they were all gone. When the nurse came back and my girlfriend woke up, a glow filled the room. We all could only smile. We all became good friends and talked a lot. From then on I made many nurse and doctor friends.”

For more information on Jason go to his website http://12.189.211.71/

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