Mother’s Day Quotes

May 8, 2010 by  
Filed under Featured

“A suburban mother’s role is to deliver children obstetrically once, and by car forever after.” Peter De Vries

“It would seem that something which means poverty, disorder and violence every single day should be avoided entirely, but the desire to beget children is a natural urge.” Phyllis Diller

“Women’s Liberation is just a lot of foolishness. It’s the men who are discriminated against. They can’t bear children. And no one’s likely to do anything about that.” Golda Meir

“All women become like their mothers. That is their tragedy. No man does. That’s his.” Oscar Wilde, “The Importance of Being Earnest”

“When you are a mother, you are never really alone in your thoughts. A mother always has to think twice, once for herself and once for her child.” Sophia Loren, “Women and Beauty”

“A man loves his sweetheart the most, his wife the best, but his mother the longest.” Irish Proverb

“God could not be everywhere and therefore he made mothers.” Jewish Proverb

“You don’t really understand human nature unless you know why a child on a merry-go-round will wave at his parents every time around – and why his parents will always wave back.” William D. Tammeus

A mother is a person who seeing there are only four pieces of pie for five people, promptly announces she never did care for pie.  Tenneva Jordan

The heart of a mother is a deep abyss at the bottom of which you will always find forgiveness. Honoré de Balzac

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Facing Off With Fear…

May 27, 2009 by  
Filed under Uncategorized

I recently saw a movie called “Veronica Guerin”, based on the life of an Irish journalist whose investigations of narcotics trafficking in her native Dublin led her on a mission to expose the devastating consequences of this activity on local communities. In doing this work she awakened the larger community to the impact of drug infestation upon the lives of families in the afflicted neighborhoods. As depicted in this film, it was her role as a mother of a young son that imbued her with an inescapable and fateful sense of empathy for the young families around her. The sense of interconnection this generated in her created a moral imperative to face down the criminals forces, and oppose the poisonous streams they had unleashed in these neighborhoods. By relentlessly working to raise the public’s awareness of these problems she was able to galvanize the community into action. Though she lost her life in the course of this fight, it was her work that ultimately cleansed these communities of the monsters residing in their midst.

The most remarkable aspect of her character was an indefatigable willingness to embrace her community with an urgency and sense of responsibility that is commonly reserved for one’s immediate family. In essence, she extended her perception of family – of those who reside within the circle of familial love – to encompass the community as a whole. This was a heroic expression of love, engendered by an equally uncommon degree of fearlessness. She did indeed experience great fear, having been shot, assaulted, and having the life of her child threatened in the vilest terms. Nevertheless she continued to pursue her work with an undaunted sense of mission, struggling at the same time to convey to her uncomprehending family that for her this was not a matter of choice, but of absolute necessity.

Her path of action was a manifestation of the hard, uncompromising face of love. It was an expression of love as an encompassing and inclusive ethic that radicals like Gandhi have espoused. It was a rare and powerful expression of one whose love is so great that it transforms the lives and circumstances of those who fall within its sphere of influence.

Her story illuminates the inter-relatedness of love and fear in the starkest terms. It unfolds amidst circumstances in which things of the greatest value were at stake and in danger of being destroyed. It concerns family in both the conventional sense and also in a wider sense that encompasses all of the human family.

Admittedly the ethos of Veronica Guerin sets the bar beyond the reach of the ordinary man. It is a story that examines the possibility of considering the bonds one shares with others in a different light. This is an aspirational theme: the expansion of one’s field of consideration and caring to include others with which one does not have an immediate, personal connection – besides sharing the same patch of ground.

This story also portrays the mystery that binds love and courage as though they share the same coin. Perhaps it is as Winston Churchill has said – that courage is the greatest of all the virtues for it is the guarantor of all the others. Fearlessness, courage allows its great accompaniment of love to take action, to come in to life.

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