Life Is What Happens While You’re Busy Making Other Plans

June 6, 2012 by  
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Today I’m thinking of John Lennon’s quote “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans”.

I am in Rio de Janeiro visiting my parents and was ready to leave back to the US when a situation came up with my dad making me stay for another couple of days.  This time it was not his health, but his business.

So, here I was yesterday with my bags packed and people and things waiting for my return when it all had to change.  Again, I was reminded life has a mind of its own.

As I think about John Lennon and the web and flow of life, thoughts of hope and failure come up.

Sometimes, when I get really tired of all the obstacles I have had to overcome and still jump over, I feel sorry for myself.  Thoughts like “I deserve to receive more for all the effort I put out in my life” dance around in my brain and I feel bad for myself.

Of course, if we think of life as a scale, then one should get out as much as one puts in.  And so should I.

It is then – while I’m throwing my own pity party – that I remember that the act of trying, the act of getting up every time I’m down, is what makes life interesting and creative.  It isn’t so much the results – which make us feel great for a moment – that create an energized life; it is the process.  It is how we find the strength and hope to create and recreate the life we want to live every single time.  This never ending process is what keeps us in the game.  Not so much the results.

So, when you feel yourself disheartened, think for a moment how your life would be if you didn’t keep going after your dreams.  Think about how it would be if you just went through the motions and you will realize – like I do – that life is really what happens while you are busy making other plans.

Please read on.

How To Begin To Cultivate Hope After Failing

By Carolyn Rubenstein

The scariest part of failure is being seen when you’re most vulnerable and least perfect. It is far safer (and easier) to hide behind dreams and schemes. It is even fun to dream and scheme — to think “what if,” and to create our own fairy tales — you know, something to look forward to, one day when you just know that it’s the right time…Continued

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The Steps Of Change

February 11, 2012 by  
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“Do one thing every day that scares you” – Eleanor Roosevelt

Change is messy.  Change is uncomfortable. But change is the only path to getting where we want to go.

Anyone over the age of thirty, know that as we get older we hold onto who we are and what we have with iron fists.  We get settled in our ways and little by little we stop seeing different possibilities of being and living.  The consequences of settling is that we stop learning and experiencing.  Something inside us starts to feel bored and trapped.  Sameness takes over.

The first step of change is to give voice to the restlessness.  What is it that of lack of satisfaction I’m feeling is trying to tell me?  What in my life needs to change?

This is a period of introspection.  We must give it room and time.  The answer lies in our ability to stay with the search.  To peel away the layers of chaos and find the clear need within ourselves.  It is there just waiting to be discovered.

One we know what needs to be change we need to commit to this even more uncomfortable phase.  We are people of habits and there is nothing more unsettling than responding to life in a different way. We feel as if we no longer have our baring.

It will be difficult at first.  We will fall back into old habits.  We will be anxious over responding differently.  But, with restrain, thoughtfulness and determination we can succeed.

Change gets us to see the world in a different way.  Change gets us to gain greater wisdom.  Change makes life more exciting and interesting.

Expose yourself to different experiences.  Have the courage to try something outside your comfort zone. Be flexible.  Breathe.

And as John Lennon said: “Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.”

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The Difference Between Loneliness And Solitude

December 14, 2011 by  
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Being solitary is being alone well: being alone luxuriously immersed in doings of your own choice, aware of the fullness of your won presence rather than of the absence of others. Because solitude is an achievement – Alice Koller

 

 

Although loneliness and solitude are often thought to be the same experience, nothing could be further from the truth.

Loneliness manifests itself as a sense of emptiness and isolation while solitude creates a sense of communion with the self.

In loneliness we ache.  In solitude we feast. In loneliness we have no one.  In solitude we are one with the self.

It is in solitude that we learn to hear our own voice, to recognize and appease the pain and to celebrate who we are.

In solitude we clear out the clutter.  We ask and answer such questions as: What’s really important to me?  What do I really want?

It is also we solitude that we provide ourselves with simple and meaningful joys.

The only way to end loneliness is through solitude because we are never alone if we are connected to ourselves.

So how do we come to create and appreciate solitude?  By taking the time to be by ourselves, to relax and to listen to what really is going on within us.  It is also by soothing ourselves with simple activities such as: a bath, a glass of wine, music or meditation.

Solitude is precious time with the self.  It is where we plan our next steps.

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Want To Be Free? Let Go Of Results

April 16, 2011 by  
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“Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans.”  – John Lennon

I’m always in a hurry.  I want things to happen yesterday, and when they don’t I get frustrated and unhappy.  I have been aware of this shortcoming of mine for a long time without having been completely successful in changing my level of expectation.  But, I do have succeeded in tampering it quite a bit.  And I believe I’m close to the finish line to living in the moment and letting go of results.  And that is what I want to share.

In my journey I first realized four things:

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Imagine – Playing For Change

March 16, 2011 by  
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People across the world singing John Lennon’s Imagine. Beautiful!

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Give Peace A Chance

January 13, 2011 by  
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Peace

By Bob Holof

On December 8, 2010, about a month earlier, the world memorialized John Lennon on the 30th anniversary of his murder. Lennon was the most famous member of the Beatles, partly because of his composing talent and mostly for his stand against violence. GIVE PEACE A CHANCE was his song and his prayer, and defined his association with the principal that civility was the answer to a great number of the world’s problems. His death at the hands of an armed assassin was horrible and ironic.

At the time of his death, and at the many worldwide memorials held a month ago, I remember how surprised I was by how easily everyone seemed to slip into the comforting illusion that this was the act of one demented individual and how unable or unwilling people were to connect the dots. We were living in a violent world where leaders and prominent supporters incited violent acts. Some demented people would hear these words and see these images and go over the edge and commit these acts.

To me it was clear that with prominence comes responsibility and prominent people should be toning down, not ramping up the violence and they should be separating themselves from those supporters who sprinkle their political, religious, or personal pronouncements with words that could incite violence.

Now a month later, after the mayhem in Arizona, perhaps chastened by the fact that this violence put them in personal danger, many of our leaders spoke of toning down the rhetoric. Others, however, took great care to refer to this as a random act by a single demented individual and made it clear that they did not think incitement to violence had anything to do with this massacre.

I don’t think anything is served by pointing to Sarah Palin’s target map or anything said by Glen Beck as the direct cause of this violence, but neither of them have followed the lead of Don Imus who admitted to having said on more than one occasion when speaking of someone he disrespected, “He should be shot” and his pledge to never say that or anything like that again.

In the 30 years since John Lennon died tens of thousands of people have been murdered in this country by violent people. Oklahoma City, Ft. Hood, the World Trade Center, made the headlines, but still few of those who could exert influence in words and deeds took the time to censor themselves and refrain from saying or doing anything that could ramp up the atmosphere of violence that pervades us. Lennon’s message of love has not been heeded.

There is an art to persuasion without rancor. It is time we learned it. If not, no one is safe.

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Want To Be Happier?

November 28, 2010 by  
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Life is what happens to you while you’re busy making other plans – John Lennon

Below is an interesting post on today’s Huffington Post on the topic of living life in the present.

The post discusses our two ailments; 1 – Either hung up on the past or planning for the future and 2 – Seldom bringing our attention to the moment we are living thus often wasting the experience.

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The Greatest Gift; Seen For Who We Truly Art

July 22, 2010 by  
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I usually read a book while riding my stationary bike.  As I have just finished “Company of Liars”, I was looking through my husband’s books for something new to read.  I found “Paint It Black”, written by Janet Fitch a friend and a neighbor.

I had only read “White Oleander” by Janet and so I was excited to start on something else written by her.  I sat on my bike and started on the book.  The time the book is set in is John Lennon’s death and the setting, my own neighborhood, Silver Lake.

On page 7 Janet writes about Josie Tyrell, the main character and her boyfriend Michael: “She held on to him, her eyes closed, drinking in his smell, pine and moss and some peculiar chemistry of his own, that she craved the way an addict craved freebase.”

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Learning to Live Life Now

June 7, 2010 by  
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featured_2My life is about projects.  I’m a producer and I am a writer.  I either get hired to produce other people’s projects – like now I’m working on a special effects film for someone else – or I originate my own projects.  At any time, I’m personally working on at least 4 different projects.  Because film, TV, books, webisodes, take a long time to come to fruition (sometimes 10 years) I have had to learn to enjoy the process.

The 10 years that take for a feature film to come together is marred by disappointments, frustrations and setbacks.  As a producer if I don’t find a way to get something out of the process, I will never make it to the end.  The same as in life.

We all have goals we want to achieve so we work towards them.  Sometimes these goals take a long time to happen and in the process of getting there, life continues to unfold.

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Yoko Ono And John Lennon

May 17, 2010 by  
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heart on the beach

heart on the beach

Over the weekend I came across this letter Yoko Ono wrote back in 2007.  I’m sure the only change she would make to the letter would be to add the 2 ½ years to the 27 years she wrote down.

——-

I miss you, John. 27 years later, I still wish I could turn back the clock to the Summer of 1980. I remember everything – sharing our morning coffee, walking in the park together on a beautiful day, and seeing your hand stretched to mine – holding it, reassuring me that I shouldn’t worry about anything because our life was good.

I had no idea that life was about to teach me the toughest lesson of all. I learned the intense pain of losing a loved one suddenly, without warning, and without having the time for a final hug and the chance to say, “I love you,” for the last time. The pain and shock of that sudden loss is with me every moment of every day. When I touched John’s side of our bed on the night of December 8th, 1980, I realized that it was still warm. That moment has haunted me for the past 27 years – and will stay with me forever.

Even harder for me is watching what was taken away from our beautiful boy, Sean. He lives in silent anger over not having his Dad, whom he loved so much, around to share his life with. I know we are not alone. Our pain is one shared by many other families who are suffering as the victims of senseless violence. This pain has to stop.

Let’s not waste the lives of those we have lost. Let’s, together, make the world a place of love and joy and not a place of fear and anger. This day of John’s passing has become more and more important for so many people around the world as the day to remember his message of Peace and Love and to do what each of us can to work on healing this planet we cherish.

Let’s: Think Peace, Act Peace, and Spread Peace.
John worked for it all his life.
He said, “there’s no problem, only solutions.”

Remember, we are all together.
We can do it, we must.
I love you!

Yoko Ono Lennon
8 December 2007

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