How To Turn Strangers Into Members Of Our Community

August 25, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

I just saw the below video on CNNMONEY.com.  It talks about a small pharmacy in New York which still thrives even though a Walgreen has moved next door.  The owner who is also the pharmacist attributes his success to customer care and his true interest in being personal and helping others.

In this age of pre-recorded messages, employees hiding behind corporations and greed, we are all starved for simple courteous daily connections.    I’m not referring to relationships with friends and family, but am discussing brief relationships we have with almost total strangers.

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Julie

July 17, 2009 by  
Filed under Blog

I received the below from Julie, a woman I know whose interview is featured on this site’s interview page.

I decided to post her submission on my blog because what she’s writing about is so pertinent to what I’ve been posting, that I wanted to make sure you all got a chance to read it.

To me Julie is an inspiration. She is the woman she describes on her interview and below; positive and always willing to help.

“I am a cancer survivor.  I lost some parts along the way, but I am still here.  I had many wonderful people who had faced adversities of their own mentor me through my grief.  I knew one day, if I could muster the strength and courage, I would give back by mentoring other cancer patients and amputees.

Today I met with a young woman named Wendy from Pasadena. She is a mother of three children ages 3, 5 and 7. She was diagnosed with Osteo-Sarcoma a year ago and had to undergo chemo and have her leg amputated below the knee to save her life.  She recently learned the cancer metastasized to her lungs and skull. After hearing the traumas she has already had to endure at the tender age of 28, it made me reflect on my own progress in grieving the loss of my right leg, hip and pelvis.

I realized…

After my first year I decided to deny it happened, after my second year I decided to be angry, after my third year I decided to let it destroy me, after my fourth year I decided to cry and recover, after my fifth year I decided to live again, after my sixth year I decided to be angry about trying to live again, after my seventh year I decided to live in gratitude and make something positive out of all my life experiences, after my eighth year I decided to stop thinking about myself so much and try to help others in need.

I can’t wait to see what I decide to have happen in my ninth year!!!

Obviously I am over-simplifying a very complex, interwoven grieving process, but I thought I’d just put in a nutshell for today.

I always learn so much from others. Thank you Wendy! You are an inspiration…whether you like it or not!  (-; ”

Julie

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