The Power Of Compassion

February 4, 2012 by  
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heart on the beach

Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing, and rightdoing, there is a field. I will meet you there –Rumi

One of the first things I do every morning is read the news.  I believe that is the same for most people.  We want to know what is happening in the world and in our communities.  We want to know how yesterday’s developments will be impacting our lives today.  But as we read about all the wars, poverty, and instability we feel overwhelmed and start to shut down.  Unfortunately, the shutting down to the pain in the news carries on to our daily lives; we start to become disconnected from our ability to feel compassion and to empathize. But, the news is not the only reason.  Our own life’s difficulties and struggles take care of whatever compassion we have left in our hearts.

The human experience is based on exchange and connectedness.  How many times we have a good experience and wonder how much better it would have been if shared with a loved one?

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What Is A Life Well Live After All?

April 14, 2011 by  
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Photo by Angie Rubin

What has interested me about the post below is a clever observation by Dr. Cara Barker.  The doctor, a Jungian analyst, while discussing what a life well lived means asks: “What brings laughter, a smile, or any kind of emotional reaction at a memorial? Is it when a list of accomplishments is read or is it when we recall funny or loving anecdotes about the person who has passed on?”

I don’t think Dr. Barker or I for that matter, are trying to be morbid.  It’s just an astute observation about – after all is said and done – what really mattered.

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Changing The World, A Tissue At A Time

January 20, 2011 by  
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Compassion doesn’t only mean stopping wars, feeding the hungry or ending the AIDS crisis.  Compassion in its most simple form is our human ability of for a moment being able to step into someone else’s shoes and understand their dilemma.

In 2007, when I first walked into the infusion center at Cedars Sinai Medical Center with my late husband,  I was taken by fear.  I looked around to the 30 – 40 people there all hooked up to a bag containing chemicals strong enough that signs were posted in the bathrooms asking patients to flush twice.  Chris and I looked for two seats together and waited for a nurse to come and hook him up as well.

Immersed in my pain, I turned my face away from Chris because of the tears running down my face. I didn’t want him to see them.  A woman sitting next to a man getting his infusion got up, picked up a tissue and without saying a word handed it to me.

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Smile Is A Short Path To Happiness

April 11, 2010 by  
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If you want to be happy, be.  ~Leo Tolstoy

Yellow Rose

Yellow Rose

So much what the world presents us is a direct result of what we present to the world.  If you open up your door and step outside with a smile, the world will smile back.  If you step outside with a frown you will most likely find doom and gloom.

We often blame the world for all of our problems as if we were just bystanders of our own lives.  True, sometimes things happen that we can not control, but mostly what we experience is a reflection of how we are feeling inside.

Why not try, as an exercise, to spend a day without getting caught up with every little thing that happens?

Why not try, as an exercise, to slow down your day enough so you can appreciate a kind word, the weather, a pet or a joke.

Why not try, as an exercise, before stepping outside your door to smile at a pleasant thought.

I’m sure at the end of your day of living life in a different way, you will want to do more smiling as your day was without a doubt lighter and you were happier and so were the people around you.

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Love After Love…

May 11, 2009 by  
Filed under Featured

The time will come

when, with elation

you will greet yourself arriving

at your own door, in your own mirror

and each will smile at the others welcome, and say, sit here. Eat

You will love again the stranger who was yourself.

Give wine. Give bread. Give back your heart

to itself, to the stranger who has loved you all your life, whom you ignored

for another, who knows you by heart.

Take down the love letters from the bookshelf, the photographs, the desperate

notes,

peel your own image from the mirror.

Sit. Feast on your life

Derek Alton Walcott (born January 23, 1930) is a West Indies poet, playwright, writer and visual artist who writes mainly in English. Born in Castries, St. Lucia, he won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1992.

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To laugh often and much…

May 11, 2009 by  
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To laugh often and much, to win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children, to earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends, to appreciate beauty, to find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch…to know even one life has breathed easier because you have lived.  This is to have succeeded!

Ralph Waldo Emerson,  (1803 – 1882) whose original profession and calling was as a Unitarian minister, left the ministry to pursue a career in writing and public speaking. Emerson became one of America’s best known and best loved 19th century figures.

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