Life Lessons With Tim Robbins

July 23, 2011 by  
Filed under Blog

Yesterday, I went to see Tim Robbins, the actor, sing with his band.  I was mildly interested in seeing his act – although Tim Robbins is a great actor – but much more excited about seeing the friend who was taking me and who knew him from when they were both students at UCLA.

When I first saw Tim, I was sitting at the bar before the show started, with my friend when he came by to say hello.  As I still can’t help myself from being judgmental, I thought to myself; wow he has aged.

Tim had a great time singing.  You could tell this was a guy who had found a different outlet for his talents.  And he sang with his brother, sister, and the posters of his recently deceased parents.  He made a show for himself maybe even more than to an audience.

Read more

Share

Change Your Beliefs; Change Your Life

March 5, 2011 by  
Filed under Blog

Photo by Angie Rubin

In writing how our beliefs shape our actions, Susan Smalley, suggests we investigate these beliefs to understand if they are bringing about kindness and positivity or envy and anger to our lives.  Not as a moral stance – kindness is good and envy is bad – but because of how we experience life based on our beliefs.  Below is an excerpt of her post:

Joseph Campbell wrote at great length about the power of mythology. I was beginning to see how our beliefs — our mythologies — provide us with a means of understanding the unknown (in my friend’s case, this odd phenomenon of 111). If what we believe generates compassion, love, and helpful actions, perhaps those beliefs are beneficial to oneself and humanity at large. If our beliefs generate intolerance, inequality and hatred, perhaps those are ones you may want to jettison. But we need to examine how we relate to our beliefs, maybe more than dispelling of them as fact or fiction.”

Read more

Share

John Wooden, The Meaning Of Success

March 20, 2010 by  
Filed under Blog

I really love John’s talk.  He says: “Reputation is what others perceive of you.  Character is what you are.  And character is always more important than reputation.”

John Wooden, affectionately known as Coach, led UCLA to record wins that are still unmatched in the world of basketball.

With profound simplicity, Coach John Wooden redefines success and urges us all to pursue the best in ourselves. In this inspiring talk he shares the advice he gave his players at UCLA, quotes poetry and remembers his father’s wisdom. John Wooden is 99.

Wooden met his future wife, Nell Riley, at a carnival in July 1926.  John and his wife had a son, James Hugh Wooden, and a daughter, Nancy Anne Muehlhausen. Nell died on March 21, 1985 from cancer.

Wooden has remained devoted to Nell, even decades after her death. Since her death, he has kept to a monthly ritual (health permitting)—on the 21st, he visits her grave, and then writes a love letter to her. After completing the letter, he places it in an envelope and adds it to a stack of similar letters that has accumulated over the years on the pillow she slept on during their life together.

Share